25 April, 2015

Yucatán Black Bean Dip: Updated | Celebrate San Antonio

The Yucatán cuisine is distinctive partly because the region was geographically isolated from the rest of Mexico for centuries. The Yucatán cuisine is also unique because of its fusion of various ethnic and cultural strands -- influences from France, Spain and Portugal, Lebanon and elsewhere in the Middle East, Africa and the Caribbean (read chef David Sterling's "Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition” published by University of Texas Press).

The flavor of this dip is reminiscent of the Yucatán dish, "Frijol con Puerco" (Beans with Pork Stew).

This recipe dispenses with presoaking the beans. Also, I've suggested epazote, an herb native to Central America, South America, and southern Mexico, if you can find it, instead of the cilantro.




Yucatán Black Bean Dip: Updated ingredients (12)
Makes 10 to 12 appetizer servings
Dip
About (10 to 12 cups / 2.5 to 3-quarts) water
1-lb. dried black beans
1-lb. lean ground pork
2 tsp oregano
2 Tbsp butter
1 cup chopped white onion
5 medium radishes, sliced
1 to 4 hot green chili peppers, seeded, peeled and minced
6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 tsp salt
1 cup green chili salsa
8-ozs. Monterey Jack cheese, grated
1/4 cup fresh cilantro or coriander, chopped or, if you can find it, about 2 Tbsp fresh epazote, chopped

For serving
Tortilla chips


Yucatán Black Bean Dip: Updated directions
01)  Get started (replaces overnight soak; read LA Times article here)
Assemble ingredients.

Fill a 6-quart stainless steel stockpot about 1/2-full of water and bring to a boil.

Meanwhile, rinse the beans in water and remove damaged beans, dirt clumps and small stones.


02)  Simmer the beans
Once the water is boiling, carefully add the dried beans to the stockpot and return to a boil.

Then, reduce heat to a simmer and continue cooking them, covered, until tender, about two (2) hours.

  • Make sure the water level is sufficient to always cover the beans by at least two inches (2-inches). Add more water, as needed.


  • When the beans are soft and the skins are just breaking open, use a slotted spoon to remove them to a large bowl and set aside.



03)  Parboil the pork
Bring bean stock to a boil. Then, add ground pork and oregano and bring to a second boil.

Drain; reserve parboiled pork and set aside..


04)  Sauté the aromatics
In a large, heavy saucepan over Medium heat, melt the butter and sauté onions, radishes and peppers until limp.


05)  Simmer the dip
To the sautéed vegetables, add the cooked beans, parboiled pork, lemon juice, and salt. Lower heat; cover and simmer until tender, about ten to fifteen (10 to 15) minutes.

Add the green chili salsa and grated cheese, stirring well and often so the mixture does not scorch. Continue simmering until cheese melts.


06)  Serve warm
Pour Yucatán Black Bean Dip into a serving dish and sprinkle over the chopped cilantro (or corriander or epazote).

Serve warm with tortilla chips.


Adapts the San Antonio Junior Forum, Celebrate San Antonio: A Cookbook Third PrintingEd. Trudy C. Kinnison and Tina C. Knight-Sheen. (Dallas:San Antonio Junior Forum Publications, 1986), 37.


Index
Appetizers and Snacks > Warm dips / spreads
black beans
Latin / Latin-style
pork

Page Last Modified 29 May 2015

No comments:

Post a Comment